Saturday, May 28

The Dangers of Driving with Alzheimer's

VIDEO + CHECKLIST OF 15 WARNING SIGNS:

See how memory problems caused by Alzheimer's make driving unsafe. Watch this thought-provoking video to open up the discussion with family members, friends and patients.


See below the video for the 15 signs it may be time to stop driving.

15 Warning Signs for Driving with Dementia

  1. Driving too slowly or too fast
  2. Receiving traffic tickets
  3. Being honked at or yelled at by other drivers
  4. Becoming upset or angry while driving
  5. Dents, dings or scraped paint on the car, mailbox or garage
  6. Misunderstanding or not noticing signs on the road
  7. Getting lost in familiar places
  8. Stopping at a green light
  9. Changing lanes without looking
  10. Drifting into another lane
  11. Having difficulty making left turns
  12. Misjudging distances
  13. Mistaking the gas pedal for the brake
  14. Causing any crash or near crash
  15. You can also follow the "grandchild test": If you would not feel safe having this person drive his or her grandchild, it's time to have a talk about handing over the keys.
Should you or your loved one be driving? Let common sense be your guide.

Source:
Johns Hopkins Health Alert, Posted in Memory, September 15, 2014

1 comment :

  1. Please note that the video does not place the "blame" on memory problems alone. Other dementia symptoms, such as visual agnosia, can make it hard for the patient to recognize where he is, to judge the relative speeds of the vehicles around him and his own, and to tell where his car is with regard to the lanes. The dementia brain does not process events and thoughts as quickly as a healthy brain. The stress of unexpected events (a car slamming on its brakes or changing lanes without warning, the sudden loud honk of a truck horn, etc) can cause a sudden worsening of symptoms, leading to confusion and failure to react appropriately. The dementia patient may be easily distracted by sights and sounds around him and focus on them instead of where he's going. Don't trust your judgment about whether your loved one can safely drive, and for heaven's sake, don't trust the doctor's -- the doctor only sees your loved one for a few minutes once every few months. Special driving tests to evaluate dementia patients are available in many locations. Have your loved one tested. And arrange for alternate transportation before you think it's really necessary -- don't wait too long. Someone could die, and it could be your loved one, you, or someone's child.

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