Sunday, July 20

International Conference Highlights Eye & Nose Alzheimer's Tests


4 trials unveil new successes in using eye scans and smell tests for Alzheimer's.

A decreased ability to identify odors might indicate the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while examinations of the eye could indicate the build-up of beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer's, in the brain, according to the results of four research trials reported today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® 2014 (AAIC® 2014) in Copenhagen.

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In two of the studies, the decreased ability to identify odors was significantly associated with loss of brain cell function and progression to Alzheimer's disease. In two other studies, the level of beta-amyloid detected in the eye (a) was significantly correlated with the burden of beta-amyloid in the brain and (b) allowed researchers to accurately identify the people with Alzheimer's in the studies.

Beta-amyloid protein is the primary material found in the sticky brain “plaques” characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. It is known to build up in the brain many years before typical Alzheimer's symptoms of memory loss and other cognitive problems.

“In the face of the growing worldwide Alzheimer's disease epidemic, there is a pressing need for simple, less invasive diagnostic tests that will identify the risk of Alzheimer's much earlier in the disease process,” said Heather Snyder, Ph.D., Alzheimer's Association director of Medical and Scientific Operations. “This is especially true as Alzheimer's researchers move treatment and prevention trials earlier in the course of the disease.”

“More research is needed in the very promising area of Alzheimer's biomarkers because early detection is essential for early intervention and prevention, when new treatments become available. For now, these four studies reported at AAIC point to possible methods of early detection in a research setting to choose study populations for clinical trials of Alzheimer's treatments and preventions,” Snyder said.

Greater Neurodegeneration Associated with Worse Olfactory Function in Cognitively Normal Elderly

There is growing evidence that the decreased ability to correctly identify odors is a predictor of cognitive impairment and an early clinical feature of Alzheimer's. As the disease begins to kill brain cells, this often includes cells that are important to the sense of smell.

Matthew E. Growdon, B.A., M.D./M.P.H. candidate at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues investigated the associations between sense of smell, memory performance, biomarkers of loss of brain cell function, and amyloid deposition in 215 clinically normal elderly individuals enrolled in the Harvard Aging Brain Study at the Massachusetts General Hospital. The researchers administered the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and a comprehensive battery of cognitive tests. They also measured the size of two brain structures deep in the temporal lobes – the entorhinal cortex and the hippocampus (which are important for memory) – and amyloid deposits in the brain.

At AAIC 2014, Growdon reported that, in this study population, a smaller hippocampus and a thinner entorhinal cortex were associated with worse smell identification and worse memory. The scientists also found that, in a subgroup of study participants with elevated levels of amyloid in their brain, greater brain cell death, as indicated by a thinner entorhinal cortex, was significantly associated with worse olfactory function – after adjusting for variables including age, gender, and an estimate of cognitive reserve.

“Our research suggests that there may be a role for smell identification testing in clinically normal, older individuals who are at risk for Alzheimer's disease,” said Growdon. “For example, it may prove useful to identify proper candidates for more expensive or invasive tests. Our findings are promising but must be interpreted with caution. These results reflect a snapshot in time; research conducted over time will give us a better idea of the utility of olfactory testing for early detection of Alzheimer's.”

The Harvard Aging Brain Study is funded by the U.S. National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association.

Odor Identification Deficits Linked with Transition from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's

Davangere Devanand, M.B.B.S., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry (in Neurology and in the Sergievsky Center) at Columbia University Medical Center and colleagues investigated a multi-ethnic (34% White, 30% African-American, 36% Hispanic) sample of 1037 non-demented elderly people in New York City, with an average age of 80.7, and assessed them in a variety of ways at three time periods – from 2004-2006, 2006-2008, and 2008-2010. UPSIT was administered in English and Spanish between 2004 and 2006. During follow-up 109 people transitioned to dementia (101=Alzheimer's); there were 270 deaths.

At AAIC 2014, Devanand reported that, in 757 subjects who were followed, lower odor identification scores on UPSIT were significantly associated with the transition to dementia and Alzheimer's disease, after controlling for demographic, cognitive, and functional measures, language of administration, and apolipoprotein E genotype. For each point lower that a person scored on the UPSIT, the risk of Alzheimer's increased by about 10%. Further, lower baseline UPSIT scores, but not measures of verbal memory, were significantly associated with cognitive decline in participants without baseline cognitive impairment.

“Odor identification deficits were associated with the transition to dementia and Alzheimer's disease, and with cognitive decline in cognitively intact participants, in our community sample. The test was effective in both English and Spanish,” said Devanand. “If further large-scale studies reproduce these results, a relatively inexpensive test such as odor identification may be able to identify subjects at increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease at a very early stage, and may be useful in identifying people at increased risk of cognitive decline more broadly.”

Eye Exam for Beta-Amyloid Correlates with Levels in the Brain and Detects People with Alzheimer's

Recent studies have identified beta-amyloid plaques in the retinas of people with Alzheimer's – similar to those found in the brain – suggesting the possibility of simple, non-invasive methods of early detection.

At AAIC 2014, Shaun Frost of the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia) and colleagues reported preliminary results of a study of volunteers who took a proprietary supplement containing curcumin, which binds to beta-amyloid with high affinity and has fluorescent properties that allow amyloid plaques to be detected in the eye using a novel system from NeuroVision Imaging, LLC, and a technique called retinal amyloid imaging (RAI). Volunteers also underwent brain amyloid PET imaging to correlate the retina and brain amyloid accumulation.

An abstract prepared by the scientists for AAIC 2014 gives the results for 40 participants out of 200 total in the study. The full study is expected to be completed later this year.

Preliminary results suggest that amyloid levels detected in the retina were significantly correlated with brain amyloid levels as shown by PET imaging. The retinal amyloid test also differentiated between Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's subjects with 100 percent sensitivity and 80.6 percent specificity.

Furthermore, longitudinal studies on an initial cohort demonstrated an average of 3.5% increase in retinal amyloid over a 3.5-month period of time demonstrating promise of the technique as a means for monitoring response to therapy.

“We envision this technology potentially as an initial screen that could complement what is currently used: brain PET imaging, MRI imaging, and clinical tests,” Frost said. “If further research shows that our initial findings are correct, it could potentially be delivered as part of an individual's regular eye check-up. The high resolution level of our images could also allow accurate monitoring of individual retinal plaques as a possible method to follow progression and response to therapy.”

The trial is a collaboration between CSIRO, Edith Cowan University, McCusker Alzheimer's Research Foundation and California-based NeuroVision Imaging. The project is part of the Australian Imaging and Biomarkers Lifestyle Study of Aging (AIBL).

Amyloid Detected in the Lens of the Eye Strongly Correlates to Amylioid Levels Detected in the Brain

At AAIC 2014, Paul D. Hartung, M.S, President and CEO of Cognoptix, Inc. and colleagues reported the results of a study of a novel fluorescent ligand eye scanning (FLES) system that detects beta-amyloid in the lens of the eye using a topically-applied ointment that binds to amyloid and a laser scanner.

The researchers studied 20 people with probable Alzheimer's disease, including mild cases, and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers; all participants' Alzheimer's status was masked from the observers. The ointment was applied to the inside of participants' lower eyelids the day before measurement. Laser scanning detected beta-amyloid in the eye by the presence of a specific fluorescent signature. Brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) scanning was performed on all participants to estimate amyloid plaque density in the brain.

Using results from the fluorescent imaging, researchers were able to differentiate people with Alzheimer's from healthy controls with high sensitivity (85 percent) and specificity (95 percent). In addition, amyloid levels based on the eye lens test correlated significantly with results obtained through PET brain imaging. No serious adverse events were reported, according to the scientists.

“There is a critical need for a fast, dependable, low-cost and readily available test for the early diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease,” said Pierre N. Tariot, M.D., Director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix, and a principal investigator in the study.

“The results of this small Phase 2 feasibility study validate our previously reported results and demonstrate the ability of the FLES system to reproduce the findings of clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's with high sensitivity and specificity,” said Hartung. “This system shows promise as a technique for early detection and monitoring of the disease.”


About AAIC

The Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) is the world's largest gathering of leading researchers from around the world focused on Alzheimer's and other dementias. As a part of the Alzheimer's Association's research program, AAIC serves as a catalyst for generating new knowledge about dementia and fostering a vital, collegial research community. Scientists leading the advancement of research gather to report and discuss the most current data on the cause, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

About the Alzheimer's Association

The Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's. Visit or call 800.272.3900.


  1. Corrected :

    As was well comproved by scientific research , in 2013 , that betamyloid accumulation it is NOT the cause of AD, but betamyloid accumulations in brain and eyes, are only consequences of health aging and are NOT the causes of AD, then research based in betamyloid biomarkers looks to be absolutely inaccurated and unecessary.

    1. The comment above it is based in the scientific articles:

      1) One article , in the medical journal Neurology (American Academy of Neurology) , with the title “Pulse wave velocity is associated with betamyloid deposition in the brains of very elderly adults” (2013) , the authors Timothy M. Hughes,PhD, Steven T. DeKosky, MD, studied a cohort of 91 DEMENTIA-FREE participants aged 83–96 years. In 2009, participants completed brain MRI and PET imaging using Pittsburgh compound B (PiB). In October 17 , 2013 , one of the the authors of the article , M.Hughes,PhD, in an interview in the site Medpage Today,declared :"When we began looking at the brains of (COGNITIVELY NORMAL) older adults we saw a lot MORE AMYLOID than we expected to see," Hughes continued to MedPage Today : "That led to the REALIZATION that the ACCUMULATION of amyloid in the brain may be COMMON in aging , and NOT as tied to Alzheimer's disease as we have thought."
      2) The article published in april,2013, in the american journal Annals of Neurology (American Neurological Association), with the title “In vivo assessment of betamyloid deposition in nondemented very elderly subjects.”, the authors wrote :“ Made a study that analysed the betamyloid deposition in one hundred ninety NONDEMENTED subjects aged ≥ 82 years old , to determine the proportion of Aβ-positive scans, they found that “ A high proportion of the cognitively normal subjects , fifty one percent (51%) were PiB-positive (had betamyloid accumulation) .”And the authors concluded that : “The data revealed a 55% prevalence of PiB positivity in NONDEMENTED subjects age >80 years”.

    2. Continuing :
      3):In another research article of the Pittsburgh University (were was created the first amyloid tracer or biomarker, the Pittsburg compound B , so called the PiB amyloid tracer) the Creators of the PiB compound, researchers dr. William E. Klunk (specialized in geriatric psychiatry) and dr. Chester A. Mathis (specialized in radiochemist) from the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine ,in the article with the title “Frequent amyloid deposition WITHOUT significant cognitive impairment among the elderly” (2008) wrote :“ Assessed by Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB - PET) imaging, and its relationship to cognitive function, measured with a battery of neuropsychological tests. Amyloid deposition can be identified among cognitively NORMAL elderly persons during life, and the prevalence of asymptomatic amyloid deposition may be similar to that of symptomatic amyloid deposition.In this group of participants WITHOUT clinically significant impairment amyloid deposition was NOT associated with worse cognitive function, suggesting that an elderly person with a SIGNIFICANT amyloid burden can remain cognitively NORMAL”. No one better than the creators of the first and main biomarker of betamyloid (so called PiB amyloid tracer ) to comprove that amyloid accumulation it is a NON reliable biomarker for AD, showing clearly the misconception of the amyloid hypothesis .


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